Jane Austen, Superman, and Henry Cavill mostly. Also Parks & Rec, Buffy, Arrested Development. We'll see how it goes.

 

DC Comics — Superman/Clark Kent:
↳ “A good Superman story fills you with awe. It’s the mythology of a sun god who wished he was a man because he saw something so great in us. It’s the story of a hero who could move whole worlds and see through stars and hear a whisper on the other side of the planet… who fell in love with a storyteller.” [x]

(Source: bionictorch)

crownedrose:

Way to go, Google! Happy Birthday, Mary Anning!!!
On May 21st, 1799, Mary Anning was born in England. She was a fossil collector, palaeontologist, and scientist who gave us some of the best discoveries in the mid 19th century. For a woman back in the 1800’s, this was groundbreaking for women and science in general.
We still struggle today to get more women involved and recognised for their work in science, so just think about how it was way back when (plus social status, etc)! Just last week I was speaking with an Anthropologist and Archaeologist (both women) on the growing number of women in science, and how great it is to see more females coming into these fields of study.
Mary Anning – for me – has been a huge inspiration ever since I was a child. She was bold, determined, and very daring with her fossil hunts. Anyone can hunt for fossils; you do not have to have a degree to do so. Now, should you sign up with a museum or society to do it? Yes, I highly suggest it, because it’s always good to make sure you are looking for the right signs, you are in safe territory, and that everything is done by the books. Each fossil is incredibly important to science!
Wikipedia has a nice long page about Mary Anning, and there’s documentaries and other resources out there to read.
I just love her, and I could go on and on about all the amazing things she accomplished, so maybe sometime in the future I will have a big post written up.
I’m currently writing a few things for you guys, so keep a lookout for those in the near future.

crownedrose:

Way to go, Google! Happy Birthday, Mary Anning!!!

On May 21st, 1799, Mary Anning was born in England. She was a fossil collector, palaeontologist, and scientist who gave us some of the best discoveries in the mid 19th century. For a woman back in the 1800’s, this was groundbreaking for women and science in general.

We still struggle today to get more women involved and recognised for their work in science, so just think about how it was way back when (plus social status, etc)! Just last week I was speaking with an Anthropologist and Archaeologist (both women) on the growing number of women in science, and how great it is to see more females coming into these fields of study.

Mary Anning – for me – has been a huge inspiration ever since I was a child. She was bold, determined, and very daring with her fossil hunts. Anyone can hunt for fossils; you do not have to have a degree to do so. Now, should you sign up with a museum or society to do it? Yes, I highly suggest it, because it’s always good to make sure you are looking for the right signs, you are in safe territory, and that everything is done by the books. Each fossil is incredibly important to science!

Wikipedia has a nice long page about Mary Anning, and there’s documentaries and other resources out there to read.

I just love her, and I could go on and on about all the amazing things she accomplished, so maybe sometime in the future I will have a big post written up.

I’m currently writing a few things for you guys, so keep a lookout for those in the near future.

cruelvalentine:

americachavez:

William H. Foster III, comic book historian, on representation in comic books. From PBS’s Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle.

Because a post crossed my dash recently asking why we need to push for more representation in comic books and media in general. 50 years later, this man still tears up because in one panel, Peter Parker spoke to an unnamed black kid. That’s why we need representation.

Weepy.

situpsandfruitcups:

romanticizedweakling:

"i was born in the wrong century," the girl sighs as she imagines a future where women have full ownership of their own bodies

Pleasantly surprised where this went

(Source: banshcc)

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)

This man is quickly becoming my new favorite person in the world.

(via foulmouthedliberty)

liberalisnotadirtyword:

odinsblog:

spillboy:

Support Cliven Bundy! Let him steal government resources for 20 more years.

Cliven Bundy is a greedy, lazy TAKER and a tax dodging MOOCHER living off the government!
I thought conservatives hated that?!?

Ladies and gentlemen, this is what a “welfare queen” actually looks like.

liberalisnotadirtyword:

odinsblog:

spillboy:

Support Cliven Bundy! Let him steal government resources for 20 more years.

Cliven Bundy is a greedy, lazy TAKER and a tax dodging MOOCHER living off the government!

I thought conservatives hated that?!?

Ladies and gentlemen, this is what a “welfare queen” actually looks like.

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

On March 25, 1911, a match was dropped and a factory exploded with fire, resulting in one of the highest losses of life from an industrial accident in the US. 146 people—mostly women—were burned alive, succumbed to smoke inhalation, or were forced to jump from the eighth, ninth, and tenth stories of the Asche Building* in New York City. Factory owners had locked the doors to stairwells and fire escapes to stop the women from taking unauthorized breaks and to stem the theft of the materials and products from the factory floor.

The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, which led to legislation to improve industrial safety standards for workers and the founding of the American Society of Safety Engineers, remains a stark reminder of the harsh conditions under which workers, including women and children, were forced to toil before workplace safety initiatives were widely employed in the US. Read more at pbs.org.

The two images above depict a view of the Asche Building interior after the fire and a demonstration of protest and mourning held several weeks after the fire.

See the entire set of powerful images from the National Archives and Records Administration collection here.

*Now the Brown Building, a part of the campus of New York University (NYU). It is located at 23-29 Washington Place, between Greene Street and Washington Square East in Greenwich Village, New York City. More.